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1970s Furniture Styles: What’s Old is New Again

The most memorable 1970s furniture styles can be characterized by a lot of wood, natural colors (think avocado green!), and geometric shapes. They were made using materials such as linoleum, metal mesh, molded plastic and fabric. Many 1970s designs have been revived in the last few years because they’re different than any other era’s design style. Whether they’re popular now or not, these 1970s furniture style were funky as all get-out!

Shag Carpet

Though not technically furniture, nothing defines 70s decor like the ever-lovin’ shag carpet.

Sommerville Loveseat

The Sommerville loveseat was designed by Michael Sommerville in 1970. The design features a tufted back, flared arms and tapered legs. They were made from polyester fabrics, vinyl with wood trim or upholstery foam over plywood frames.

This type of furniture is still very popular today.

Modular Furniture

This 1970s furniture style was made to be both functional and affordable. Modular furniture is designed for easy transport in pieces, usually a sectional piece at a time from the store or factory to your home. The sections are then assembled on site. This type of 1970s design features clean lines with hidden fastenings.

Wood Finish Furniture

Also known as Country furniture, this 1970s style is characterized by natural colors and soft shapes with rounded edges. Pieces were most often made of wood (and sometimes metal). Wood finish furniture was a popular choice for those who wanted to infuse traditional elements into their home decor while still embracing the spirit of 1970s modernism.

Natural Wood Furniture

This 1970s furniture style is characterized by natural-colored wood pieces, often stained dark or left unfinished with a varnish finish. Pieces are typically made of solid pine in simple shapes that reflect the craftsman’s skillful use of materials and traditional methods from the past century. This 1970s furniture style is still popular today.

Postmodern Furniture

This 1970s-era design has become one of the most iconic 1970s styles to date. It’s characterized by a fluid, organic style that blends modernism and postmodernist forms with decorative elements from periods throughout history (mostly late 19th century). The result is a mix of styles and colors. This 1970s furniture style is still popular today.

Molded Plastic Furniture

This 1970s-era design was made to resemble the look of natural materials like wood, metal, or stone. It’s characterized by sleek shapes with an emphasis on clean lines that are often slathered in bright finishes such as red, orange, and yellow. This 1970s furniture style is still popular today.

Chairless Furniture

This 1970s-era design was made to free up space while also maximizing the use of a room’s floor plan by eliminating chairs from dining rooms or living spaces in general (usually done with some other form of seating). It’s characterized by sleek shapes with an emphasis on clean lines. This 1970s furniture style is still popular today.

Noguchi Case

This 1970s-era design was made to look like a sculpted indoor garden or outdoor landscape in the form of living room display pieces, coffee tables, and lamps. It’s characterized by organic forms that are often slathered in bright finishes such as red, orange, and yellow. This 1970s furniture style is still popular today.

Working Furniture

This 1970s-era design was made to be mobile and multipurpose – often used for both work and leisure activities simultaneously. It’s characterized by sleek shapes with an emphasis on clean lines. This 1970s furniture style is still popular today.

Eames Chair

This iconic 1970s-era design was originally created by Charles and Ray Eames for use in their home, but the chair soon became a favorite of designers around the world. It’s characterized by organic curves with an emphasis on natural materials such as wicker and animal hides. This 1970s furniture style is still popular today.

Danish Modern

This 1970s-era design was based on simple, clean lines with an emphasis on natural materials and geometric shapes such as squares or rectangles. You’ll often find this type of modernist design in the United States Midwestern states like Illinois. This 1970s furniture style is still popular today.

Mid-Century Modern

The term “mid-century modern” refers to furniture from the 1940s through 1970s, with a focus on clean lines and organic shapes. Mid century modern design can be seen across America in everything from homes to office buildings to entire neighborhoods like Palm Springs, California. This 1970s furniture style is still popular today.

Boho

The 1970s boho design was heavily influenced by the hippie movement, and had a focus on asymmetry; it also drew inspiration from natural materials like leather, wicker, or wood. This 1970s-style is not as common in modern decorating – though you might see features of 1970s boho style in things like Moroccan or bohemian decor.

Funk

The funk movement that emerged from the 1960s was heavily influenced by ethnic art and R & B music, with a focus on bright colors and organic materials such as plants and animals. This 1970s furniture design is not very common today – but sometimes you might find 1970s funk design in items like lamps and artwork.

Minimalism

The 1970s minimalist movement had a focus on simplicity, often using monochromatic or neutral colors with an emphasis on clean lines and fewer decorative elements. This style is still popular today as more than ever before – many people now think of minimalism as a design style that is timeless, rather than something from the 1970s.

Hanging Chairs

Hanging chairs were popular in the 1970s as an alternative to standard furniture. These days, while they are still a novelty item that is sold in places like Target and Walmart, hanging chairs don’t seem to be very common on TV or movies – do you remember ever seeing them anywhere?

(Like 1970s Furniture Styles? Then you might like our article on 1960’s Furniture Styles, click here.)

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